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March, 2013

  1. Ghostbuster Costume For Kids

    March 21, 2013 by mom

     

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    Last Halloween, two of my grandsons wanted to be Ghostbusters. They are child size 3 and 4, give or take. I used McCall’s costumes M6417, kids pattern size 3 to 8.

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     Pattern

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    Because all the sizes are in the pattern, I trace the pattern in the sizes that I need. When I am tracing the pattern piece, I write all the info that is on the original pattern piece. I also write the size that the pattern piece is. website loading test It makes it so much easier to cut out the fabric when you don’t have to fold the original pattern piece to the size you need.

    I use a tracing paper that we bought online at www.DickBlick.com. It comes on a roll: 12″, 18″ or 24″ by 20 yard roll, or 12″, 18″, 24″ or 36″ by 50 yard roll. I use the 36″ X 50 yard roll because I use all sizes of patterns and you can get more on a section of the tracing paper.

     

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    My grandsons have short arms and legs, so when I laid out the pattern on the fabric, I folded up the pattern piece in the place that said to shorten or lengthen. I wrote on the pattern piece of the pants where the size 3 length would be and folded up the pattern to cut the fabric at the size 3 length.

     

    Fabric

    The fabric I used was a heavier cotton muslin that did need to be pre-washed to get the sizing out and let it do its shrinking. I used the heavier muslin because I knew it would be cold when they went Trick-or-treating. I also wanted the fabric to last longer than a day or two.

     

    Sewing

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    I do not have a Serger that works so I sewed the seam twice and then did a zig-zag stitch on the outside of the seam. I knew being a costume it would be played with often. So I believe in sewing things that will last.

     

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    I do not like rough edges, so the casing you have to make at the waist for the elastic on the sides and back I folded over once at the outer part of the seam and then sewed it down. I made sure the seam was folded toward the top direction of the outfit.

     

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    I then used my handy dandy sewing ruler and measured one inch by folding it up to the top of the outfit to make the casing. (I love the metal rulers with a metal seam gauge. They are hard to find because they make it with a plastic seam gauge now.)

     

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    I sewed it in place following where I sewed before when I was getting rid of the rough edge.

     

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    The pattern calls for a zipper up the front. Because it is a costume to wear over other clothing I decided to use 2 Velcro strips (or if you want to call it Hook and Loop. I prefer Velcro.)  Lining them up to each other can be a bit tricky. Decide where you want the Velcro to be, then pin in place. Sew the bottom side down on both then the top side down. I sewed inside the seam so it wouldn’t show.

     

    Name Tag

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    The name tag is a 1-inch wide grosgrain ribbon folded under on both sides. My daughter wrote the name on the ribbon, then I folded the ends in and sewed it on.

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    We used the Ballpoint Embroidery Paint by Aunt Martha’s. We bought it at Hobby Lobby using their 40% off coupon that they have every week lately. I love Hobby Lobby– they have so many different sewing and craft supplies.

    Patch

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    My daughter-in-law bought the Ghostbuster badge online and had it shipped to me. I sewed it on using black thread. I stayed on the outside black part of the patch. I do not trust iron on to stay on so I always sew on patches using the same color thread as whatever the border color is.

    Measurements for Sewing

    I did use the measuring guide of the boys’ measurements to get the arms and legs the right length, the inseam measurement for the leg and the length of the arm (shoulder to wrist) to get the sleeve right, and also around the wrist of the sleeve for the elastic.

     

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    The outfit did go together quite nicely. I was so glad that the boys loved the outfit and that it fit them fine. All I can say is, don’t let an outfit scare you. It goes together one piece at a time. So take your time and enjoy the ride.


  2. Twelve Days of Easter

    March 13, 2013 by mom

    Egg Set

    My daughter Jennifer gave me this awesome idea for The Twelve Days of Easter. It uses 12 plastic eggs, 1 egg carton and 11 different things that represent the story in the New Testament of Jesus Christ’s last days before the Resurrection.

    I have made this gift for my married children to use with their families.  I also made this craft with a group of thirteen girls that were between the ages 8 and 11 and they loved making them.

    Each plastic egg is numbered, 1-12 with a permanent marker. Each egg contains a strip of paper listing the item and its meaning, along with the scripture that goes with it. There is a master paper that has the information and the scripture verses that are used.

    The Things I put into the Eggs:

    Egg 1

    1~Sacrament Cup: I asked my church if I could have a few of the Sacrament cups for this project.

    Egg 2

    2~Knotted Twine: I got cheap twine and cut it about 3 inches. I tied a knot in the middle of it, then put glue on the knot part to hold the knot in place.

    Egg 3

    3~3 Silver Pieces: I used 3 silver beads. Other people have used 3 dimes. Whatever works for you.

    Egg 4

    4~A piece of Soap: I used one of those small bars of soap you get at a hotel. I cut it in small pieces. I used a small plastic bead bag to put it in, just so it wouldn’t get all over the place. Cutting up a large bar of soap works fine too.

    Egg 5

    5~Square of Scarlet Cloth: I used a piece of nice red cloth. I cut it 2″ by 2 1/2″ size.

    Egg 6

    6~Nail or Wood Match Stick: I used 3 nails, 1 1/2″ size. I felt they were safer than matches with children.

    Egg 7

    7~Die: I used a normal die.

    Egg 8

    8~Small Rocks: I used pea gravel. You can find it in the garden section of a store like Wal-Mart or Home Depot. I used a dark brown or black tulle & 1/8″ white ribbon to tie it closed. I used a double knot to make sure it stayed closed.

    Egg 9

    9~Strip of White Cloth: I used a loose weave white fabric. I had nice fabric too but I felt that the loose weave fabric would be more of a burial cloth.

    Egg 10

    10~Spices: I used cinnamon sticks and whole cloves. I cut the cinnamon sticks into small pieces. I used one small piece of cinnamon and a few whole cloves. I wrapped them in red tulle and tied it with 1/8″ white ribbon again to tie it closed as I did before.

    Egg 11

    11~Stone: I used stones that I think I got at a craft store like Hobby Lobby (they have such a variety of crafts there). Just a small enough rock that fits in the egg. Big enough that it can represent the Tomb door.

    Egg 12

    12~Last egg remains empty.

     

    Download the Master Paper here to get easy access to the scripture references and where you can print off the strips that go inside each egg.

     

    When I did this project with the group of girls I simplified it for them a little.  For each girl I had an egg carton with the twelve plastic eggs inside, an envelope with the word strips already cut, the paper with the number and scriptures printed on it, and a sandwich bag with all the items in it. I went over it with the girls, showing them a finished one first.  It was simple and the girls enjoyed the finished product!

    I hope that this project helps you and your family and friends enjoy the Easter holiday a little more this year and years to come.  Happy Easter!